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Yalka Dreaming (bush onion) Tie — Daphne Napurrula Marks
Yalka Dreaming (bush onion) Tie — Daphne Napurrula Marks

Yalka Dreaming (bush onion) Tie — Daphne Napurrula Marks

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This painting shows the Yalka Dreaming (bush onion), which is situated in a place called Analy, close to Town Bore Outstation. Bush onions grow after the rain and are collected by all the women. The yalka are found underneath the surface and can be eaten raw or cooked in the hot sand next to the campfire. Paintings referring to this Dreaming show diverse motifs such as plants, leaves, seeds, layers or roots.

About Better World Arts

Better World Arts has been operating for over two decades. Initially, they worked with traditional handicrafts. In 1996 they invited Aboriginal artists to join their projects and soon after decided to focus on the Aboriginal art side of the projects. They now work with Australian Aboriginal artists from remote communities across Australia, from Arnhem Land to Central and the Western Desert regions, from rural locations and from cities.

About the artist

Daphne was born in 1979 at Alice Springs hospital. Daphne’s mother was Jillian Jugadai Napapltjarri and her father was Loue Marks Tjakamarra. 

In her spare time, Daphne paints whenever she can, a well as hunting and cooking Goanna’s, shopping and looking after her sons. Her family is very important to her and she spends a lot of time looking after the welfare of her extended family. Daphne has an eye for detail and paints meticulous translations of the Yalka Tjukurrpa (bush onion dreaming). Her work becomes particularly vibrant after the rains when the newly emerged plants dominate her paintings.

Daphne was passed down the right to paint the Yalka Tjukurrpa at Karrkurutinytja (Bush onion dreaming at Lake Macdonald) from her grandmother Narputta. Narputta was born close to this sight, she also painted this story.


Materials